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Cocktails with Chris

hosted by Christine Potter   //   Friday at 4p est

"I'm just a gal who likes to mix things up: music, strange cocktail ingredients, and a swanky Nick & Nora ambiance with old school free form rock and roll radio.  It's no secret that I'm a little obsessive about all things Robyn Hitchcock, but my husband's OK with it.  Besides, I end every Cocktails with Chris by standing next to one of the world's great pipe organs for a few minutes and subjecting my listeners to the sometimes-deafening results.  I promise you a tasty cocktail recipe every week, along with music that starts with The Comedian Harmonists, careens through psych and prog rock, and often smashes into the shoals of roots and jazz.  Not to mention a sprinkling of indie pop, and Brit folk. Join me high atop the Potter building, in a swanky neighborhood near you." - cp

Thursday
Dec062012

An Even More Wintry Daiquiri

So I'm thinking of calling it the You Poor Deer. 

Although it's not very appetizing naming a cocktail after what's left of the doe that got squished on the road outside our house and about which I have been exchanging friendly phone calls and emails (DAILY FOR THE BETTER PART OF A WEEK) with the local Highway Department.  Today, they say, it gets hauled off to deer Valhalla.  Today, they will Send The Truck Around.  For the love of all that is holy, let it be so.

Meanwhile, I wanted to make a drink of the week using apple cider--sweet cider, although I imagine you could go kinda French 75 with pub cider in a drink...perhaps that's next week's experiment.  So I did something very much like the daiquiri last week, but it came out wildly different in taste.  Here's the formula:

You Poor Deer

2 oz amber rum

1 oz lemon juice

3/4 oz apple cider

1/2 oz falernum

Taste for balance and add a little more cider or falernum if you like more sweet or spice. Shake hard over ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass.  Garnish with apple and/or lemon slice, cut creatively, and sprinkle with a pinch of freshly ground netmeg. 

 

See you on the air at 4 today.  I'll pull out the Brubeck records, yes!

 

 

Wednesday
Nov282012

A December Daiquiri

Mr. Potter and I wanted a rum drink the other night, but we wanted one that was not too Carmen-Miranda's-hat kinda a thing.  Something more warming than cooling, but something we could still shake with plenty of ice and find refreshing and the spur for good conversation.  I came up with this, and I like it.  I've been into the spicy liqueurs lately--the ginger and allspice-y stuff.  Check it out, anyway:

 

THE DECEMBER DAIQUIRI

1 and 1/2 oz amber rum

3/4 oz lime juice

1/2 oz allspice dram

1/2 oz peach brandy (I didn't use the fancy stuff, and what I had was on the sweet side)

dash of grenedine (if you like it a little sweeter--taste first)

 

Shake hard over plenty of ice, strain into a chilled cocktail glass with a lime quarter perched on the rim!

 

Worked for us--see ya on the air at 4 Thursday!

Wednesday
Nov142012

One For The Other Side

A couple of the most loyal fans of my radio show here on A24r are Republicans.  And yet they still listen to me!  They argue with me on social media, and yet they message me with requests during my show.  This fact helps me believe that there is a God after all, for surely their loyalty to my pinko Thursday afternoon musical happy hour is a real, alert-the-Vatican miracle.

After coming up with the Barry O last week--which, by the way,  is a pretty strong drink, so go slowly with it--I felt like I needed to reach a hand across the aisle.  I might disagree with you on the size and role of government or on how to run public schools, but I would never EVER want you to be thirsty!  

So if The Barry O is complex, powerful, and chocolate inflected, what would The Mitt Romney be?  Well, Saturday Night Live suggested milk, and after all Mitt's an LDS Mormon fella.  They don't drink coffee, even.  That gave me kind of an evil thrill.  How about a drink that has a bit of a kick to it, but tastes utterly innocent?  Using The Mary Pickford as a kind of prototype, I came up with what I first called The Mitt Rum-ney and then decided needed a nicer name.  Hence:

THE OTHER SIDE OF THE AISLE

1 and 1/2 oz silver rum

1 and 1/2 oz pineapple juice

3/4 to 1 oz lime juice

3/4 oz Domaine de Canton

a generous dash of Allspice Dram or Falernum

 

Taste for balance, shake hard with LOTS of ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. As always, you might want it more or less sweet.  In this case, I'd start with the lesser measure of lime juice and add more if you want a sharper edge; too much Domaine de Canton could overwhelm the drink, but the proper amount chimes nicely with the pineapple and the dash of spicy Allspice Dram or Falernum (whichever bottle you have or like better).  The drink should be a pretty golden color with froth on the top from the pineapple.  Garnish with a piece of fresh pineapple if you have some or a slice of lime if you don't. 

Warning: this absolutely does NOT taste like it has booze in it, so it would probably be a good idea to keep it away from folks like poor old Mitt.    Cheers and I'll see you on the air at 4 on Thursday!

Wednesday
Nov072012

Post-Election Day Cocktail: More Chocolate!!

I'm home.  And I'll be (God willing and the creek don't rise) be doing my usual Area 24 radio show Thursday at 4 PM!

I'll tell you about my journey--and Lord was it ever a long one--on the air.  But here's a cocktail that sort of segues out of my trip and into my Life Back At Home, a cocktail I dreamed up last night whilst my dearest and nearest were watching the election returns.  It uses a rare ingredient: chocolate bitters.  I used Scrappy's, available here, but you could also use Fee Brothers, which Amazon carries.  Found the Scrappy's at Theo Chocolate in Seattle on my last day there; I had taken the tour of their factory.

So, for the wonderfully non-vanilla second term President of the United States:

THE BARRY O

1 and 1/2 oz bourbon

1/2 oz red vermouth

1/2 oz lime juice

1/4 to 1/2 oz creme de cacao (Bolls, silver variety)

1/4 to 1/2 oz Domaine de Canton liqueur (this is ginger-flavored)

a dash or two chocolate bitters

NOTE: Start with the lesser amount of sweet stuff (the creme de cacao and gingery liqueur) and taste.  You may want a full half oz of both liqueurs--or not.  This should not be a dessert-tasting drink, but different people have different palates.

Shake hard over ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass with a pretty garnish: I'd suggest a curl of lime zest or perhaps a quarter-wheel of lime.  Good, eh?

Here's to four more years!  And speaking of 4, that's when I'll be on the air Thursday!

Wednesday
Oct102012

A Cocktail, with Chocolate in it, Named for a Train!

And now for something completely different...

There are things that happen in a cocktail shaker or a mixing glass that defy expectation.  Consider the ingredients in a 20th Century Cocktail: gin, lemon juice, chocolate.  Sounds not so tempting, yes?  Ah, but add the quinine-y French aperitif Lillet, and you have something complex, a little sweet, a little sour, and with all sorts of other things slinking around in the background.  It's a really yummy drink.

The original recipe for the 20th Century Cocktail was British, although the drink was named after an American train, the 20th Century, that ran between New York and Chicago.  The delightfully illustrated Savoy Cocktail Book has a bit too much creme de cacoa in; I like a more Ted Haigh-type take on the beverage.  Here's how:

The Twentieth Century

1 and 1/2 oz gin (don't use your Hendricks or Magellan--Beefeaters or even New Amsterdam is fine)

3/4 oz fresh lemon juice

3/4 oz Lillet

about 1/2 oz (or less, to taste) creme de cacao--not Godiva!  You need a clear bottle--Bolls is good.

Shake hard over ice, strain into a chilled cocktail glass.  Traditional garnish is a lemon twist, but an edible flower can be nice on this drink, too.  I used to drop a couple of chocolate chips, olive-in-a-martini-style, in the bottom, but that's silly.

And by the way, if you bought Lillet just for this, store it in the fridge, as you would red or white vermouth, which it is a little bit like.  It'll stay fresh-tasting much longer that way.  It's a nice ingredient; I'll try to post a few more recipes that use it. 

There now--isn't that GOOD?  Cheers and see  you on the air Thursday at 4 PM.